Contests from Kallisto Gaia Press

The following message recently arrived in the Guild’s email inbox from Tony Burnett, managing editor, Kallisto Gaia Press, a 501(c)3 literary nonprofit.

The 2018 Julia Darling Memorial Poetry Prize

A prize of $750.00 and publication in The Ocotillo Review Winter 2019 will be awarded for a poem of up to 65 lines. Submit up to three poems of no more than 65 lines each with a $20.00 entry fee by August 20, 2018. All entries will be considered for publication. All entrants will receive a copy of the journal containing the prize winning poem. Carrie Fountain will judge. A portion of any revenue generated will be donated to Cancer Research at M. D. Anderson Hospital. See Kallisto Gaia Press website for details.

The 2018 Chester B. Himes Memorial Short Fiction Prize

A prize of $750.00 and publication in The Ocotillo Review Winter 2019 will be awarded for a short story. Submit one story of less than 4200 words with a $20.00 entry fee by August 20, 2018. All entries will be considered for publication. All entrants will receive a copy of the journal containing the winning story. Antonio Ruiz-Camacho will judge. A portion of any revenue generated will be donated to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research. See Kallisto Gaia Press website for details.

Please note: The Guild frequently receives messages about contests. The decision to publicize them depends in part on the reputation of the sponsoring organization, the potential reward and benefit to members, and how much, if any, the entry fee is. Typically, the limit for the entry fee considered reasonable is $25, though we may make exceptions for local contests where the likelihood of Guild members being recognized is higher. Keep these factors in mind when determining the value of entering contests publicized on the Guild’s website.

Flash Fiction Contest

A message regarding a contest, this one for flash fiction, recently arrived in the Guild’s email inbox from San Miguel Literary Sala.

The San Miguel Literary Sala announces a Flash Writing Contest open to writers of poetry, haiku, fiction, and nonfiction. The winner in each genre will be awarded $75 USD and their entry will be published in the 2019 edition of CROSSROADS: LA VIDA CREATIVA EN SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE, the annual cultural arts magazine published by the San Miguel Literary Sala, AC.

Distinguished Judges

Poetry: Jennifer Clement

Haiku: Cristina Rascón

Fiction: Sandra Gulland

Nonfiction: Kelly Sundberg

Publication

The winning poem, essay, and story from the 2018 contest will be published in the 2019 edition of CROSSROADS, and each winning writer will receive $75 and 5 copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Eligibility

All writers are eligible to submit original work written primarily in English. However, administrators of the San Miguel Literary Sala, the San Miguel Writers’ Conference, and Crossroads magazine are ineligible.

Eligible Work: Work submitted must be unpublished. Work may be simultaneously submitted elsewhere. If it is published or accepted to be published prior to the judging, it will be disqualified from the competition.

Deadline

Entries must be received by midnight on Sunday, July 1, 2018. We will announce the winners by November 30, 2018.

Length

Poetry: 1 poem, 50 lines maximum including stanza breaks, 100 character limit per line, including title.

Haiku: 3 haiku, each following the form of 5, 7, 5 syllables per line.

Fiction and Nonfiction: 750 word maximum, including title.

Entry Fee

Entry to the contest requires a $20 fee. The fee is payable by credit/debit card or PayPal.

Online Submission System
Submit one entry per $20 fee via our online submission manager.

  • No entries via email or mail will be considered for the contest.
  • Submitted work must be original and previously unpublished in any form.
  • This is a blind competition. An entry will be disqualified if the name of the writer is attached to the submission.
  • Entry fees are not refundable.

Please note: The Guild frequently receives messages about contests. The decision to publicize them depends in part on the reputation of the sponsoring organization, the potential reward and benefit to members, and how much, if any, the entry fee is. Typically, the limit for the entry fee considered reasonable is $25, though we may make exceptions for local contests where the likelihood of Guild members being recognized is higher. Keep these factors in mind when determining the value of entering contests publicized on the Guild’s website.

Anthology Submission Process and Evaluating Criteria

The anthology published annually by the San Diego Writers and Editors Guild is a collection of poetry, essays, memoir tales, and imaginative short stores by our members. Submissions are judged in three categories: narrative, essay, and poetry.

The Process

Submissions are sent to the managing editor who removes all identifying information, categorizes each submission, and assigns an anonymous control number. Each anonymous narrative or essay submission is sent to no less than two reviewers. Reviewers are asked to grade the submission according to prescribed evaluating criteria using a set of metrics to determine how well the submission has met the criteria for the category. Submissions are guided through the review process by the managing editor or one of two additional assistant editors. (Note: Poetry submissions are sent to the poetry editor.)

After a submission has completed the review process, the author is notified by an editor whether or not the submission is accepted for publication as is, or if there are recommended changes. When revisions/corrections are recommended, the editors offer to work with authors to bring the submission into compliance with the recommendations for publication.

Submission Categories

All submissions must fit a specific category: Narrative, Essay, or Poem. Volumes have been written describing each and every nuance of these categories from the narrowest to the broadest. However, in its simplest terms and for our purposes, the three categories are defined as follows:

Narrative

narrative is an account of a sequence of events usually presented in chronological order. A narrative may be real or imagined, nonfictional or fictional. Another word for narrative is story. The structure of a narrative is called the plot. Narrative writing can take various forms, including personal essaysbiographical sketches (or profiles), and autobiographies in addition to novels, short stories, and plays.

Essay

In the broadest sense, the term essay can refer to just about any short piece of nonfiction—an editorial, feature story, critical study, even an excerpt from a book. However, literary definitions of a genre are usually a bit fussier. A personal essay is a short work of autobiographical nonfiction characterized by a sense of intimacy and a conversational manner.

A critical essay is a form of academic writing that analyzes, interprets, and/or evaluates a text. In a critical essay, an author makes a claim about how particular ideas or themes are conveyed in a text, then supports that claim with evidence from primary and/or secondary sources. In casual conversation, we often associate the word “critical” with a negative perspective. However, in the context of a critical essay, the word “critical” simply means discerning and analytical.

Poem

A poem is a literary work in which the expression of feelings and ideas is given intensity by the use of distinctive style and rhythm. A poem is writing that formulates a concentrated imaginative awareness of experience in language chosen and arranged to create a specific emotional response through meaning, sound, and rhythm.

Evaluating Guidelines

Once the submission is assigned a category for review, the piece is reviewed by no less than two reviewers using the following guidelines by category:

Narrative

Beginning

  • Is the lead-in intriguing? Does it pull the reader into the piece?
  • Are there sufficient sensory details for the reader to visualize the situation?

Character

  • Are characters effectively revealed through multiple methods of characterization (physical description, actions, inner thoughts, speech, etc.)?
  • Are main characters given specific internal markers (motivation, emotion) and external markers (attributes, mannerisms)?
  • Are minor characters made realistic in some way (action, dialogue)?

Plot and Theme

  • Is the plot interesting? Does it make sense within the confines of the genre?
  • Is the action described in enough detail so the reader can visualize it?
  • Does the plot come to a satisfying conclusion?

Style

  • Does the piece stand on its own?
  • Is the content suitable for publishing in the anthology (i.e., no vulgarity or gratuitous violence, etc.)?
  • Is the verb tense consistent with the flow of the story?
  • Are there no more than 4-5 minor errors in grammar, usage, or mechanics?

Essay

  • Does the piece demonstrate a clear and consistent mastery of the subject matter?
  • Has the author demonstrated an effective and insightful point of view on the issue?
  • Is the piece well organized and focused?
  • Is there a skillful use of language, using a varied, accurate, and apt vocabulary?
  • Has the author demonstrated a meaningful variety in sentence structure?
  • Are there no more than 4-5 minor errors in grammar, usage, or mechanics?

Poetry

  • Does the form, rhythm, and meter complement the content, and are they natural rather than artificial and forced?
  • Has the author chosen words that enhance the meaning by producing feelings and images that enable the poem to realize its intent?
  • Is the language precise, vivid, and detailed?
  • Are line endings and breaks used to appropriately create emphasis?
  • Are poetic devices used effectively?
  • Does the poem provide a fresh perspective on the topic?

We hope these guidelines will help you as you prepare your narrative, essay, or poem for submission. Should you have any additional questions, please contact the managing editor at guildedpensubmissions@gmail.com

______________________

(References for definitions of Narrative and Essay forms of writing from: “Glossary of Narrative and Rhetorical Terms,” Richard Nordquist, https://www.thoughtco.com/narrative-composition-term-1691417; definition of poetry from on-line reference material: English Oxford Living Dictionary and Merriam-Webster Dictionary.)

Image credit: Maria Fernanda Gonzalez

Novel Network: Connecting Authors with Book Clubs

San Diegan Susan McBeth launches Novel Network, first-ever national registry that connects book clubs with visiting authors, on Sunday, June 10, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the San Diego Central Library, 9th floor Special Events Room.

With more bricks and mortar booksellers closing their doors, authors are getting creative about marketing their books. Making “house calls” to book clubs is not just a way to sell more books, though. It’s a great way to connect with readers who want meaningful discussion with their favorite authors.

That’s why San Diego resident Susan McBeth is launching NovelNetwork™, the first-ever national registry of authors and book clubs looking to connect.

Image credit: John Carlisle

SD/PEN Invites SDWEG to Networking Event: June 21, 6:30 PM

Mark your calendar! The San Diego Professional Editors Network annual networking event is scheduled for June 21, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at the San Diego County Health Services Complex.

They have once again invited members of the San Diego Writers and Editors Guild (SDWEG) to join them for another fun evening of noshing and networking! Enjoy snacking on tasty hors d’oeuvres and desserts while chatting with your fellow SD/PEN members and meeting some writers from SDWEG. There will be drawings and games for prizes!

Don’t forget to bring your business cards!

RSVP to info@sdpen.com.

Event Details

Thursday, June 21, 2018
6:30–8:30 p.m.
San Diego Room
County Health Services Complex
3851 Rosecrans Street
San Diego 92110

Image credit: Burst

April-May Issue of Suspense Magazine

The editors of Suspense Magazine once again sent a link for Guild members to access the latest issue of their magazine.

Spring is the time we need to shed that winter coat and open up the windows. We have put together a great issue for you. As always we would like to thank you for all the support you have given us over the years. It really is a pleasure to bring you the very best author interviews, reviews, articles and much more. Now let’s see what’s in this issue.

  • Jack Carr
  • Alma Katsu
  • Jake Tapper
  • Steena Holmes
  • Lee Goldberg
  • Rhys Bowen

Barry Lancet and Anthony Franze are back with their latest “Articles on Talking Writing.” Dennis Palumbo tells us “How not to overwrite.” We step back in time and bring back a great interview that was only on Crime and Science Radio, hosted by D.P. Lyle and Jan Burke, as they talk with Michael Tabor, a forensic dentist that has stories you won’t believe. Along with all the reviews, we have some more surprises inside. So enjoy your spring showers and takes for taking us with you.

 

Click on the cover to get the magazine.

Don’t forget to check out Suspense Radio and all the shows on the station. www.blogtalkradio.com/suspensemagazine.

If you write suspense, mystery, horror, or thriller fiction, consider submitting your work to Suspense Magazine. Submission guidelines are here.

Useful Websites For Writers

Today, there are so many websites offering writing and marketing advice that it’s hard to make sense of it all. To help, here are snippets from The Write Life’s article (by Marisol Dahl) titled “The 100 Best Websites for Writers.”

Creativity:

how-to-write-a-book-now.com features tools, tips and secrets to help you write a book and fulfill your dream of authorship.

Freelancing:

fundsforwriters.com lists the best competitions, grants and other well-paying markets.

penandprosper.blogspot.com features an array of topics, tips and tricks to help you experience financial success with your writing.

writersweekly.com — around since 1997, this site is a tried and true resource for freelancers, offering regular updates on paying markets.

Marketing:

marketingprofs.com offers articles, podcasts, training events and more about marketing.

Publishing:

mystorydoctor.com offers tips and workshops on how to write your story and get it published.

well-storied.com is a blog and resource hub to help you more easily craft a brilliant novel.

Domenico Loia

SDWEG authors will be featured at La Jolla Library on May 12

On Saturday, May 12, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 17 authors — all of them members of SDWEG — will be showcasing their published works at display tables at the La Jolla Library (7555 Draper St., La Jolla). Visitors will have a chance to greet these gifted writers, find out how they became authors and what they specialize in, and (hopefully) purchase signed copies of their work. The list of authors and their story subjects includes:

SDWEG members are asked to drop by the event to show their support for the organization and their fellow writers.

For details, go to: sdwritersguild.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/LA-JOLLA-LIBRARY-SHOWCASE-Flyer.pdf. Or you can contact the La Jolla Library at (858) 552-1657

 

What You Missed at the April Meeting

Guest speaker Henry Herz has become a well-established writer of children’s illustrated books, with nine published books and five under contract for publication in 2018 and 2019. He earned this success by traveling down the hard road of the independent (indie) writer/publisher and the even harder road of traditional book publishing.

Having taken both paths, he had some excellent advice for our members. He emphasized that to choose between indie and traditional publishing, you must answer some fundamental questions. He posed more than half a dozen questions, such as “Are you willing to work hard?” “What is your reason for publishing?” “Do you want to publish right away?” And perhaps most importantly, “Can you handle criticism and rejection?”

As you come to grips with your honest answers, you will be able to decide whether indie or traditional publishing suits you. Henry also delineated the pros and cons of indie vs. traditional paths. In a nutshell, the indie path is quicker and easier but you end up tackling many costs, chores, and obstacles that traditional publishers typically shoulder for you. But again, the choice is up to you.

In closing, Henry offered his professional services for those who need help on the indie path. You can contact him at henryherz.com.

Expired: For All Memoirists From Marni Freedman

SDWEG honorary member Marni Freedman sends this invitation to all accomplished and novice memoirists. See the full message below. Note that the events mentioned in Marni’s message will take place at San Diego Writers, Ink, in Liberty Station.

Just a quick invite to our goings on this Saturday [May 5, 2018, at San Diego Writers, Ink].

If you are interested in submitting to the Memoir Showcase this year, we would love to see you at our FREE CLASS this Saturday from 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

TO SUBMIT to the showcase: CLICK HERE.

And if you want to spend even more time with us, come to the Memoir Association meeting at 2:45(ish) for the Yes, You Can Publish Panel where two authors will be talking about how to look for and acquire a small pub and how to submit to books like Chicken Soup for the Soul.

To learn about the panel, CLICK HERE.

Really hope to see you – and hope you all submit!
warmly,
Marni
Photo credit: Igor Ovsyannykov