Find Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference Online

October 27-29, 2017. Pasadena, CA. Writer's Digest Novel Writing Conference

Visit us: http://www.novel.writersdigestconference.com

Writer’s Digest: http://www.writersdigest.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/writersdigest

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/writersdigest

F+W Media: www.fwcommunity.com

SDWEG is a promotional sponsor for the Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference. SDWEG members will receive a $25 discount by using code SDWEG17 when registering.

Book Marketing Ideas: Part 5

Book Marketing Ideas

At the Guild’s August Marketing Support Group meeting, Laurie Asher shared a document with 89+ Book Marketing Ideas That Will Increase Your Web Presence.

Below are the another ten of those ideas, with annotations.

41. Create a fan page for your main character (works well if they are in a series)

Author Media, the source for the 89+ ideas, recommends Facebook Pages for Fan Pages. Check out this article on their site.

42. Ask fans to create their own book trailers and post them online

It just may be that your fans have talents you don’t know about or have yourself. What have you got to lose by asking?

43. Offer core fans advanced copy of future books

See Tip #39 on Book Marketing Ideas: Part 4.

44. Ask fans to post pictures of “character spottings”

This idea would work well with Instagram. Ask fans to use the hashtag you created for your work so you can find them all easily.

Here’s the Ultimate Guide to Hashtags on Instagram.

45. Offer “extra features” on your website

Author Media provides this list of examples of what extra features might consist of.

46. Use Twitter hashtags

Check out this list of the 44 Twitter Hashtags every author should know, from Author Media.

47. Poll your readers and listen to what they say

You can create a poll on your Facebook author page.

You can create a poll on your WordPress blog. (You can probably create a poll on any website or blogging platform. I happen to know more about WordPress than others.)

48. Answer all your blog comments

At a minimum, thank the commenter.

49. Engage with your fans on FB.

Pose questions on your Facebook author page.

50. Ask your fans to post pictures of them reading your book

Use your Facebook author page as the place fans should post their photos.

Used with permission The Write Practice – see more at http://www.authormedia.com/89-book-marketing-ideas-that-will-change-your-life/

Book Marketing Ideas: Part 4

Book Marketing Ideas

At the Guild’s August Marketing Support Group meeting, Laurie Asher shared a document with 89+ Book Marketing Ideas That Will Increase Your Web Presence.

Below are ten more of those ideas, with annotations. Some are no-brainers. Others require a great deal of effort. Stick with what’s within  your comfort zone.

31. Create business cards with your web address on them and hand them out.

Why stop at just the web address? The Guild’s business cards include our meeting location, meeting date, and times for the various portions of the meeting.

32. Put your photo on your business card for stronger branding.

You won’t find any examples of creative business cards to illustrate including your photo, but your photo will be easier for others to connect with you than any cute gimmick.

33. Start commenting on other blogs (early and often).

If you already have a WordPress blog, you can find other blogs on similar topics by using the WordPress Reader. Once you are logged in for your site, go to wordpress.com and your Reader view will open. See the sample below.

Select the “Discover” link in the left column to find examples of blogs you can follow. Browse what’s there and click on the “Follow” link on any blogs you’d like to see more of in your Reader.

 

Note that Ben Huberman has more than 15 million followers. (I think he works for WordPress which could explain that very large number.) That’s a huge potential audience for your content, too, if you join the conversation on his blog by adding your thoughts as replies to his posts.

Or select the “Search” option and type subjects you are interested in. Then browse those blogs to find some you want to follow.

Most importantly, add a comment, something more than just “great post” or “I really enjoyed reading this.” Your comments should be related to the post and express your interest in specifically what the blogger has said. If your comments are general in nature, they may be filtered to the bloggers’ spam folders.

If you don’t already have a WordPress blog, search for blogs on topics of interest and sign up for newsletters to be informed of new content. And then add your comments to the blog posts you read.

34. Host regular author hangouts on Google+.

Don’t know what Google Hangouts are? Check out this description from TechTargetNetworks:

Google Hangouts is a unified communications service that allows members to initiate and participate in text, voice or video chats, either one-on-one or in a group. Hangouts are built into Google+ and Gmail, and mobile Hangouts apps are available for iOS and Android devices.

Live Google Hangouts require some work to set up. Here are some tips from Daniele Rossi of The Community Manager.

35. Host regular author interviews on Google+.

The interviews don’t have to be long. But if you begin hosting them, continue to host them regularly. A one-time interview is unlikely to get much attention.

36. Record your Google+ hangouts and put them on YouTube.

Keep your videos for YouTube short, no longer than five minutes. Don’t upload a video on YouTube unless you can honestly say you are proud of what is included and how it looks.

37. Get social media coaching.

This is a tough one. Search for “social media coach” and then review the results to see if you find someone you feel comfortable working with at a price you are willing to pay.

38. Create an online community with a forum.

Oh boy. That’s what all this social media stuff is all about.

39. Say thank you to readers with special incentives for being a fan.

Possible incentives include

  • Advanced Reader Copies of your next book for the first ten people to post a review on Amazon or Goodreads,
  • Refrigerator magnets of your book cover (or something else) for the first ten people to reply to a blog post–a tip from SDWEG member Laura Roberts,
  • T-shirts with a picture of the cover of your book to the first three people who sign up for your newsletter,
  • The right to name a character in your next book to the winner of a raffle among all the names on your mailing list.
40. Ask your reading community to design merchandise for your store.

Maybe your book could use a companion coloring book. These days even adults like coloring books. Ask your readers to draw up a list of images for the coloring book.

Do some brainstorming and add more ideas in the “Leave a Reply” field at the end of this post.

Used with permission The Write Practice – see more at http://www.authormedia.com/89-book-marketing-ideas-that-will-change-your-life/

Membership Benefit of the Month–Speakers’ Bureau

#SDWEG, #speaker

Members of The San Diego Writers and Editors Guild who are willing to speak at meetings of outside organizations may be listed on the website’s Speakers Bureau page. To be listed on this page, members should provide the text to briefly inform groups looking for speakers about the specialty topics for presentations as well as an image of any book covers to be included on the page. Send the information to sandiegowriterseditorsguild@gmail.com. Groups looking for speakers are required to make arrangements for presentations directly with an individual listed on the page. Speakers available are listed alphabetically with their contact information.

September Speaker: Gregory Fournier

Our Speaker in September, Gregory A. Fournier, will speak about his experience writing the true story of the Ypsilanti serial killer.

Fournier received his bachelor and master’s degrees from Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti while the Washtenaw County murders were occurring. He lived one block up the street from John Norman Collins and had several unpleasant brushes with him. Like so many other people in Ypsilanti, it was not until Collins was arrested and his photograph ran on the front pages that Greg could link a name with the face. He has first-hand knowledge of the Ypsilanti/Ann Arbor area and many of the people associated with these cases.

Literary Classics has selected Fournier’s book, Terror in Ypsilanti, to receive the Literary Classics Seal of Approval. The CLC Seal of Approval is a designation reserved for those books which uphold the rigorous criteria set forth by the Literary Classics review committee, a team comprised of individuals with backgrounds in publishing, editing, writing, illustration and graphic design. The same organization awarded the book its 2017 Literary Classics Silver Book Award in their true crime category. In May, the 2017 International Book Awards selected the book as a finalist in their true crime category.

Greg has appeared on the Investigation Discovery Channel as a guest expert on John Norman Collins for their true crime series A Crime to Remember in an episode entitled “A New Kind of Monster.” He is the author of Zug Island: A Detroit Riot Novel and writes a blog entitled Fornology.

Book Marketing Ideas: Part 3

Book Marketing Ideas

At the Guild’s August Marketing Support Group meeting, Laurie Asher shared a document with 89+ Book Marketing Ideas That Will Increase Your Web Presence.

Another ten of those ideas, with annotations, follow. Pick one to implement before the October meeting, and use the “Leave a Reply” field at the bottom of the post to share your experience with us. Or consider Tip #30 below–produce a guest blog post for the Guild’s website.

21. Start a FaceBook campaign to increase your fans

What is a campaign? Think of it in advertising terms. According to Lindsay Kolowich of Hubspot:

An advertising campaign is a group of ads centralized around one message. They often use many different marketing channels to get this idea across. The timing of these campaigns are also very clearly defined.

So a Facebook campaign is a group of ads centralized around one message posted to your Facebook author page.

Kolowich lists the 12 marketing campaigns she rates as the best in this article. Check it out to see how many of them you remember seeing when the campaigns were launched.

This post explains how to use Facebook ads to structure a marketing campaign.

Here’s an example of a marketing toolkit for the online marketing campaign for Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference, provided by Writer’s Digest to assist the Guild in being a sponsoring partner.

22. Start a Google Campaign to increase traffic to your site

See that little green word “Ad” in a green box to the left of the link to the LaJolla Playhouse website in the Google Search results screen? It indicates the LaJolla Playhouse uses Google AdWords in its marketing campaign for its productions. AdWords ensure the search results appear at the top of the list, not to be lost on a second or third screen full of results.

This post explains how to use Google Adwords to structure a marketing campaign.

23. Start a controversial web series

It doesn’t have to be a new website, just another Category on your existing website.

What do I mean by Category? Take a look at the top menu on my personal blogsite, sandrayeaman.com.

The menu at the top of my blog includes links to pages (Home, About, and About Book Reviews) as well as three categories (Blogging, Book Reviews, and Guest Post). Assigning posts to specific categories ensures that visitors to the site can see all posts assigned to a category when they select the appropriate link from the menu.

To create a controversial web series, add a new category to your site and assign all posts in the series to that category. Add the new category to your main menu so your site visitors can find it. And then add content.

24. Link up with other writers for your controversial web series

The above suggestion is part 1. To be effective at engaging a larger audience, you need part 2–linking up with other writers.

Once you have a category assigned to your controversial web series, use the social media platforms you already are comfortable with (Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter) to broadcast the url of the link to the category and invite other writers to join the discussion.

Use a hashtag for your controversial web series with your posts on Facebook, Twitter, etc. For more information about hashtags, see Tip 20 in this series on Book Marketing Ideas: Part 2.

While perhaps not controversial, the April A to Z Challenge is an example of how one blogger came up with an idea–to write a post each day in April, taking Sundays off, with each successive post centering on a topic beginning with the next letter of the alphabet–and then invited other bloggers to join in. April 1’s topic was about a subject that begins with “A.” April 2’s topic was about a subject that begins with “B.” And so on. That series has been running annually in April since 2010.

25. Start weekly twitter chats with readers

Watch for a separate series on Twitter Chats, courtesy of SDWEG member Diana Diehl.

To get an idea of what a Twitter Chat looks like, check out Rachel Thompson’s weekly #bookmarketingchat on Twitter on Wednesday nights at 6 Pacific Time. Of course, you need to have a Twitter account in order to take part.

26. Keyword your blog posts

You should assign both Categories and Keywords (WordPress uses the term Tag in place of Keyword) to your blog posts. Think of Categories as the general topics and Keywords as the sub-topics. On the Guild’s website, there is a category for every page (the items linked in the left column of the website if you view it on a computer), but not for every keyword.

For example, Writing is a Category, but nonfiction, novel, poetry are assigned as keywords. I also include the names of SDWEG members mentioned in an article as keywords to ensure relevant articles will appear in search results.

The Search feature on WordPress relies on both Categories and Keywords to pull up posts of relevance.

27. Create a monthly newsletter

If you have time to do this, let us know.

28. Create an affiliate program

Here’s a list of Affiliate Programs for bloggers from Authority Hacker.

29. Host guest bloggers

Invite authors of similar works to post items on your blog. Hosting other bloggers multiplies your potential audience reach.

30. Become a guest blogger

Don’t forget the Guild’s website as a potential place for your guest blog post. The subject must be relevant to the Guild’s audience and should not be a blatant sales pitch. Share information you have gained with fellow members. If you try out one of these ideas, consider writing up your experiences–good or bad–to share in a guest blog post. Send your suggested post to sandiegowriterseditorsguild@gmail.com.

Used with permission The Write Practice – see more at http://www.authormedia.com/89-book-marketing-ideas-that-will-change-your-life/

Get What You Need: Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference

October 27-29, 2017, Pasadena, CA. Writer's Digest Novel Writing Conference

Three days of learning, four tracks to explore, and one novel to perfect— yours.

The Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference—an intensive, extended weekend focused solely on the novel—is returning to Southern California this fall! This event is your opportunity to build a better book from the ground up, from the first sentence to the marketing plan. Join Writer’s Digest in Pasadena this October 27–29.

Get What You Need:

Whether you need help with the broad strokes of your novel or guidance for fine tuning your nearly finished manuscript you’ll find sessions offering what you need across multiple tracks. Mix and match sessions among Craft, Character, Genre and Beyond!

Do What You Love:

Fuel up on the creative buzz of being around hundreds of other writers. Make new friends and meaningful connections; Mix, mingle and network at the Halloween-themed Cocktail Reception. Come dressed as your favorite character or literary figure!

Be Inspired by the Best:

So far the speaker roster includes New York Times bestsellers Lisa See and Neal Shusterman among dozens of others! Lock in your best price when you register by October 26. novel.writersdigestconference.com

SDWEG is a promotional sponsor for the conference. SDWEG members will receive a $25 discount by using code SDWEG17 when registering.

Book Marketing Ideas: Part 2

Book Marketing Ideas

At the Guild’s August Marketing Support Group meeting, Laurie Asher shared a document with 89+ Book Marketing Ideas That Will Increase Your Web Presence.

Below are ten more of those ideas, with annotations. Pick just one to try out before our September meeting and use the “Leave a Reply” field at the bottom of the post to let us know what you learned from the experience.

11. Offer bloggers advanced reading copies

To find bloggers who may be interested in reviewing and Advanced Reader’s Copy (ARC) of your book, find a book similar to yours, include the book title in quotes, the author’s name in quotes, and “book review.” For example, if your book is similar to this year’s One Book, One San Diego selection, your query should look like this:

“Chris Bohjalian” “The Sandcastle Girls” “Book Review”

The results from that specific query will include bloggers and reviewers who are interested in your genre. Read through the reviews to identify bloggers you would like to review your book.

This tip came from Fauzia Burke when she spoke at Publishers and Writers of San Diego in May 2016.

12. Go on an online book tour

Huffington Post published a piece on how to set up an online book tour in 2013.

A slightly more up-to-date article from 2014 in Publishers Weekly tackles the same subject.

A 2015 article from Writer’s Digest also provides tips.

13. Create a book launch team

This one could be a lot of work, but if done well, could also save you, the author, time by multiplying your message through your team. The simplest description I found concerning a book launch team came from Lee Constantine, on Medium.

14. Host Q+A sessions on Google+

Check out this post, also from Author Media, about three Google+ features every author should know about.

15. Create Facebook Friday videos

When I don’t know where to begin to look for how to do something new with any social media platform, I turn to Social Media Examiner and search their website by typing the social media platform and the new concept into their custom box in the right column, just under the full-screen width banner inviting site visitors to sign up to receive their newsletter. Searching for “Facebook videos” brought up 100 recent posts since May 2017.

16. Register as an author on Amazon

Check out Amazon’s post on how to do this.

17. Register as an author on Goodreads

To find out how to do this, check out the Goodreads post here.

18. Create a book trailer

Check out the trailer for Larry Edward’s award-winning book, Dare I Call It Murder for an example.

Check out Henry Herz’s trailer for his children’s illustrated book, Cap’n Rex and His Clever Crew, developed using an iMovie template.

19. Add the free My Book Table plugin to your WordPress website to boost book sales.

My Book Table is another plugin from Author Media, the same group that came up with the My Book Progress plugin (and the same organization that put together the original list of 89+ ideas). For more information about the My Book Table plugin, see this description.

For examples of what the plugin looks like on a WordPress site, check out this page.

Like My Book Progress, installing My Book Table requires your website be on the WordPress.org platform.

20. Create a hashtag for your next book

Hashtags (# followed by a string of letters) organize content on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Google+ (and maybe other social media platforms) providing a way to view related content from multiple Twitter users.

Here’s a Beginners Guide to Hashtags.

Used with permission The Write Practice – see more at http://www.authormedia.com/89-book-marketing-ideas-that-will-change-your-life/

Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference

October 27-29, 2017, Pasadena, CA. Writer's Digest Novel Writing Conference

Introduction

Attending the Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference is like stepping into the magazine’s pages! Attendees enjoy a long weekend focused solely on their novels and leave inspired, more confident in their abilities and with a greater understanding of the current publishing landscape, including self-publishing opportunities. This event is the chance to build a better book from the ground up and from the first sentence to the marketing plan!

When Is It?

October 27 to 29, 2017, in Pasadena, CA.

Learn from the Experts

Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference boasts a lineup of speakers that features New York Times bestselling authors—including Lisa See and Neal Shusterman. They’ll join a host of literary agents and industry experts at this uniquely positioned event—one of the few focused exclusively on the craft and business of novel writing.

Who Attends Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference?

Writer’s Digest’s attracts a dedicated group of writers at many different stages of their careers. Some are looking to publish for the first time, others to improve their marketing and promotional plans and sell more copies. Most have been writing for years and they want and expect relevant information to further their careers and are willing to invest in it.

The San Diego Writers and Editors Guild is a sponsoring promoter of the Writer’s Digest Novel Writing Conference. SDWEG members may obtain a $25 discount by entering code SDWEG17 when registering.

Book Marketing Ideas To Increase Web Presence: Part 1

Book Marketing Ideas

At the Guild’s August Marketing Support Group meeting, Laurie Asher shared a document with 89+ Book Marketing Ideas That Will Increase Your Web Presence.

Below are the first ten of those ideas, with annotations. Pick just one to try out before our September meeting and use the “Leave a Reply” field at the bottom of the post to let us know what you learned from the experience.

1. Create a testimonial page on your website.

Check out samples of testimonial pages on HubSpot.

2. Add the free My Book Progress plugin to your WordPress website to update your visitors about the status of your upcoming book.

Here’s information about the plugin, from WordPress and Author Media. Note: This plugin requires the website be self-hosted WordPress.org, not the free WordPress.com. You can find samples of how the plugin displays at the bottom of this page.

3. Retweak the Search Engine Optimization (SEO) on your site.

There are books written on SEO.

Consultants who wish to help maximize the effectiveness of the SEO on your site can be found by searching the Internet for “SEO.”

Check out this Google guide to SEO.

4. Ask fans to post their reviews on your Facebook page.

Facebook provides information on how to set up a Facebook page.

Check out YouTube for videos explaining how to set up an author page. Try this one to get started. It’s only eight minutes long.

5. Ask fans to post their reviews on Amazon.
6. Ask fans to post their reviews on Goodreads.
7. Sign up for Twitter.
8. Clean up your social footprint.

This post on Social Media Examiner spells out the steps involved in cleaning up your social footprint.

9. Create an author FB page and use it instead of your profile.

See Item 4 above.

10. Sign up for Google Authorship.

Oops. Google stopped supporting Authorship in 2014.

 

Used with permission The Write Practice – see more at http://www.authormedia.com/89-book-marketing-ideas-that-will-change-your-life/